Follow us via Email

Sign up to receive this newsletter and get special low genealogy discounts sent to your email.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Thursday, September 20, 2018

The Old Wagon Road from Pennsylvvania

The Old Wagon Road from Pennsylvania

old wagon road from PennsylvaniaMany of Scotch-Irish immigrants who settled in Pickens County came from York County, Pennsylvania and were caught up in the Revolutionary War. Job Smith volunteered as a private in the regiment of Captain Benjamin Few and Colonel Leonard Marbury. He was at the siege of Savannah before going to Powell's Fort to serve under Captain Nathan Smith for the purpose of guarding frontiers against Indians. Then, was at the fall of Charleston under Captain John Johnston; at the siege of August and Ninety Six. In all, he served five years.  . . . more . . .



Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Wednesday, September 5, 2018

The Approach to Finding SC Families #southcarolinapioneerscom


The Approach to Finding South Carolina Families

Berne, SwitzerlandThe best way to find South Carolina families during the 18th century is to search for surviving church records and written histories for arrival dates and places, including the names of certain religious groups and their ministers. It is a study of the new emerging religious groups which were undergoing a rather dramatic and far-reaching change and Reformation. For example, a Calvinist of Lutheran church might ultimately reform to Presbyterian. The era of Reformation had its issues, so it is best to better inform oneself in order to grasp what was happening and where to search next.


Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Tuesday, September 4, 2018

I am Learning so much from your Brick Walls

I am Learning so much from your Brick Walls

Jeannette Holland Austin
"Thanks to everyone who has sent their brick wall for me to work on thus far. I am enjoying the challenge! There are so many interesting factors in this work, from the ports of immigration and the various settlements in America to families of more recent times. If you have not yet taken advantage, please do so now. JOIN now for free brick wall help 

Members, please CLICK HERE to view the results of this work as you may share the same families!" Jeannette Holland Austin 



Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Friday, August 24, 2018

Names of Richmond County SC Ancestors #southcarolinapioneersnet

Names of SC Ancestors --- > Richland County #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy #scwils

Richland County South Carolina Wills

Millwood PlantationRichland County was formed in 1785 as part of Camden District. In 1791 a small portion of it went to Kershaw County. The county seat is Columbia, which is also the state capital. In 1786 the state legislature decided to move the capital from Charleston to a more central location. A site was chosen in Richland County, which is in the geographic center of the state, and a new town was laid out. During the War Between the States General William T. Sherman captured Columbia and burned the town and parts of the county on February 17, 1865. Early Settlers: Richard Adams, Casper Coon, John Belton, Benjamin Everitt, John Dodd, Christian Kinslery, Samuel Jackson, William Partride, Mathias Libecap and others.

Richland County Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Will Book 1787-1853
  • Will Book C (1787 to 1805)
  • Will Book G (1806 to 1823)
  • Will Book H (1823 to 1834)
  • Will Book K (1834 to 1839)
  • Will Book L, Part 1(1840 to 1858)
  • Will Book L, Part 2 (1854 to 1864)

Transcripts of Richland County Wills (1787 to 1796)

Names are listed here : Adams, Richard; Allison, Andrew; Belton, John; Blanchard, Benjamin; Braswell, Hannah; Coon, Casper; Coosmaul, Henry; Daniel, Richard; Dodd, John; Duncan, Mathew; Everitt, Benjamin; Faust, John Henry; Gill, John; Haswell, Robert; Heath, Ethel; Hill, Robert; Hollis, Edward; House, Thomas; Howell, Arthur; Howell, Thomas;] Huggins, William; Jackson, Samuel; Kinsler, Christian; Libecap, Mathias; Mack, Conrod; McKinstra, John; McLemore, Joel; Miers, John; Partridge, William; Pembleton, John; Reese, Joseph; Ross, James; Rowan, Samuel; Shirling, James; Sledde, Seten W.; Taylor, Mary; Westcott, David; Westcott, Ebenezer; Whitaker, William Jr.; Whitaker, William Sr.; Wimberly, Mary. more names ... 



Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Friday, July 27, 2018

Fort Prince George in Edgefield Co. SC #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy #scancestors #scwills

Fort Prince George

Fort Prince GeorgePictured is the excavation of Fort Prince George showing post molds outlining a structure within the fort. During 1966 the staff from the South Carolina Institute of Anthropology and Archaeology with the cooperation and support of Duke Power, commenced an archaeological salvage of the area purported to be the site of the old fort. This excavation continued until May of 1968 when it was covered by the rising water of Lake Keowee. As early as 1734, the importance of a fort had been recognized in Charlestown, however, its construction was postponed. The colonists, instead of building the fort themselves, petitioned the Parliament of Great Britain to build it. After years of delay the province was compelled to do the work at its own expense with the Council directing that land be purchased from the Indians and that the fort be erected as near as possible to the Indian town of Keowee. Finally, during the fall of 1753, Governor Glen visited the country of the Lower Cherokees and purchased the land from them upon which to build the fort. This purchase presumably included the districts of Abbeville, Edgefield, Laurens, Union, Spartanburg, Newberry, Chester, Fairfield, Richland and York. The fort was called Fort Prince George but only held the peace for a short while before massacres began again and the savages were as restless as before. The South Carolina governor again invited the Chiefs to meet him in conference in Charlestown, but they refused, lending the excuse that they feared contracting the fatal sickness of smallpox. They did, however, meet at Saluda Old Town, which was between the Nation and Charlestown. The purpose was to settle upon a stronger peace than earlier versions. see names of ancestors --- >



Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Marlboro County Probate Records #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy


Marlboro County Probate Records

Wedge PlantationMarlboro County, originally spelled Marlborough, was created in 1785 as part of the Cheraw District. Marlboro County itself was named for John Churchill (1650-1722) the first Duke of Marlborough and British commander. One of his descendants was Sir Winston Churchill. Some of the first settlers were Welsh Baptists from Delaware who established the Welsh Neck region around 1737. English and Scotch-Irish settlers settlers came to this region to grow cotton. The county seat is Bennettsville. 

Marlboro County Probate Records Available for Members of South Carolina Pioneers 

Index to Probate Records

  • Index to Marlboro County Will Book A (1787 to 1853)

Transcripts of Wills (1787 to 1803)

Testators: Thomas Bingham; Robert Blair, George Cherry; Archibald Colquohoun; Margaret Colquohoun; Jesse Council; John Covington; Moses Craner; Josiah Evans; Shadrick Fuller; Mary Gordon; William hardwick; George Hicks; Thomas James; Thomas Lide; Joseph Lister; Aaron Manship; Joseph Maxwell; Joseph McDaniel; Isaac Neavel; Moses Pearson, Claudius Perguies; Leavy Quick; Lewis Stubbs; William Stubbs; Elizabeth Stroud; Joel Winfield.

Miscellaneous Estates 1789 to 1830

  • Conner, James
  • Conner, Lewis
  • Conner Thomas
  • Conner, William

Miscellaneous Deeds

  • Misc. Deeds 1786-99; 1802-1808
  • Misc. Deeds 1786-96

Transcripts of Marlboro County Wills (1804 to 1826)

Testators: Ammons, Thomas ;Bedgegood, Malachi Nicholas ;Bennett, William ;Bethea, Jesse ;Brigman, Isaac ;Brown, Edmund ;Brown, William ;Burn, Absalom ;Campbell, Robert (Captain) ;Cochran, Thomas; Colquhoun, Margaret ;Cottingham, Charles ;Cottingham, Jonathan Sr. ;Covington, John W. ;Covington, Robert ;Crosland, Edward ; David, Elizabeth ;Davis, Mary ;Dunnam, William ;Edwards, Mary ;Elerbe, William ;Evans, Elizabeth ;Evans, John; Forniss, William ;Harry, David ;Henagan, Barnabas ;Hill, James B. ; Hodges, Henry ;Hodges, Sion ;Huckaby, Thomas ;Ivey, James ;Lee, Mason; Lide, John ;Lizenby, Stevin ;Macy, Joseph ;Marlow, James ;Maxwell, Joseph ;McColl, David ;McColl, Duncan ; cColl, Duncan (2) ;McRae, Alexander ;Miller, Abner ;Neavil, Rhoda ;Neavel, William ;Newton, Giles ;Parker, Steven ;Pledger, William ;Pouncey, Anthony ;Pouncey, Anthony (2) ;Purnell, Robert ;Quick, Aquilla ;Quick, Thomas ;Robertson, Drury ;Robeson, Luke ;Smith, William ;Stewart, David ;Stewart, Donald ;Thompson, Robert ;Turner, Thomas ;Whittington, Francis ; Whittington, Margaret ;Wilson, John ;Windham, John ;Winds, Samuel ;Wright, Sarah


Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Friday, July 20, 2018

Darlinigton Co. SC Wills and Estates #southcarolinapioneersnet #scancestors #scgenealogy


Darlington County

Summerford FarmsDarlington County was formed in 1785 and the county seat is situated in Darlington. It was originally part of the Cheraw District, and later (1888) part of it was given for Florence County and again in (1902) to Lee County. Traditionally, Welsh, Scotch-Irish, and Englishmen farmed this land and ultimately planted cotton. Some early settlers were : David Rogerson Williams (1776-1830), Governor and scientific experimenter, James Lide Coker (1837-1918), Moses Scott, Absalom Gallaway and David R. Coker (1870-1938).

Darlington County Probate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records

  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 3 (1813)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 4 (1814-1840)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 10 (1838-1853)

Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797); Digital Images of Transcripts

Gallaway, Absalom James, William | Scott, Moses | Webb, Jolly

Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812); Digital Images of Transcripts

Beasley, John | Berry, William | Cannon, George | Cole, James | Connell, William | Cuttino, Elizabeth | DeWitt, Charles | Fountain, William | Ganey, Isaac | Gee, William | Hafe, John | Hafe, John (2) | Ham, Henry | Harrell, John | Harts, James | Hatchel, Morris | Hixon, Thomas | Kimbrough, Hannah | Mackintosh, John | McBride, Archibald | McBride, Sally | McCall, John | Mercer, Jesse | Mikell, Anne |  more names --- >


Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Friday, July 13, 2018

Finding the Old Homeplace #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy #scwills #scprobate #scancestors


Finding the Old Homeplace

homeplaceFinding one's past can be as simple as locating the old homeplace. It creates a special sort of memory, one which you did not have originally because it was before your time. This lovely old lake with geese is absent the old house. Yet, I still experience the feeling that "I am home." This is but one of the ways that searching for ancestors becomes real. You know that your families lived their generation building a homestead and a special sort happiness from having the family work together, oftentimes on old farms. The generations of the past paved the way for our freedoms and the great wave of technology which we are experiencing today and which assists us in finding them. Imagine that! 


Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Friday, July 6, 2018

Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church #southcarolinapioneersnet #scgenealogy #scancestors #scwills


Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church

Fishing Creek ChurchThe Scots-Irish settlers who immigrated from Chester, Pennsylvania about 1755 named the county of Chester. Also, interestingly, Chester, Pennsylvania was named after Chester, England, so this might be a clue as to the origin of some of the ancestors who settled Chester County. Many belonged to the Fishing Creek Presbyterian Church which still stands today, however, the original building is veneered over with brick.
see names of Chester Co. Ancestors in the Wills --- >



Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Wednesday, June 27, 2018

Pendleton Co. SC Genealogy Records

Pendleton Co. SC Names of Ancestors

Pendleton County Deeds

Woodburn Plantation

Cherokee Indians lived in this region long before the American Revolution. During the war for independence, the Cherokee's sided with Great Britain. It was this decision which led to the loss of their land then located in the northwestern corner of South Carolina. But two months of fight during the summer of 1776 between the local patriot militia and the Cherokees, defeated the Indians. In 1789 this land had became Pendleton County, later re-named Pendleton District. Today we know it as Anderson, Oconee and Pickens counties.  

Pendleton County Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Deeds

  • Index to Pendleton District Deeds for 1840
  • Pendleton District Deeds (digital images) 1825 to 1831
  • Names of Grantors: These same transactions apply to Anderson County. Some of these deeds include estate transaction. The names listed below are grantors. Other names are included in each deed transaction. Grantors: Armstrong, William | Birchfield, James | Brown, William | Bruster, John | Bruster, William | Burns, Leroy | Cooper, Washington | Cox, Sarah | Earp, David | Elliott, Nancy | Evans, Zachariah | Hembree, Daniel | Hooper, Hiram | Hunter, John | Kay,Mary | Keaton, Archibald | Kennemore | Light, Jacob | Loden, Jesse | Matheson, Thomas | May, William | Merritt, Allen | Pullen, Leroy | Quails, Chloe | Shearman, John | Stewart, James | Tippin, George | Trotter, Robert | West, Priscilla | Wyatt, Elijah
  • Bruster, John, LWT, transcript
  • Burch, Henry, estate, 1823
  • Liddell, Andrew, LWT, 1820
  • Liddell, Moses, LWT, 1802
  • Rogers, Hugh, LWT, 1801
  • Pendleton County Land Grants, List of, Books A & 


Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate free genealogy help JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Thursday, April 5, 2018

Join the Genealogy History Blog. Tips, Clues, Great Articles!

Will you Allow AI to Construct your Genealogy?



Photo credited to Dezeen.com
Imagine yourself instructing your computer to assemble a pedigree chart based on the information you provide. As AI draws upon information across thousands of genealogy platforms and assembles the data, would you trust the results?  If IT had access to all of the world's genealogy records, it would probably deliver a fairly accurate genealogy.  The brick walls and suppositions in our work would be analyzed from a mathematical standpoint. Let us face the fact that math is a true science.  I can imagine that when AT hit the brick walls, that he would provide us with a logical choice of the data. Our decision, then, would culminate from the mathematical prowness of a computer. But what about the tidbits of data stored inside our own brain, a sort of family knowledge?  Aunt May always said that our family came to America from Germany, for one example.  There are countless others couched inside of our own brain, not that of IT.

The fastest computer in the world uses about 40,000 processors with 260 cores each. That is more than 10 million processing cores running in parallel. Although each of these cores has less power than the intel processor on your desktop, the entire machine delivers about the same power as the human brain. Interesting. Nevertheless, that does not mean that AI is ready for big things such as robot control. Far from it.  This massively parallel architecture still presents enormous programming challenges in all of the processes powered together. The growth of the IT industry demands the use of custom microchips, more parallelism, more sophistocated software, and even the possibility of entirely new ways of doing computing.  for more articles, Join the Genealogy History Blog





Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate genealogy real estate JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Thursday, February 22, 2018

Join the Genealogy History Blog

An invitation to join the "Genealogy History" blog which offers daily articles concerning tracing families from foreign shores and throughout America.  Also, some interesting articles on historical events and how our ancestors are connected by genealogical research.  


Join now! Please check your email and confirm the subscription









Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate genealogy real estate JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Thursday, November 9, 2017

1/2 to Seniors to 8 Genealogy Websites

Unprecedented Low GENEALOGY Rate for Senior Citizens - 1/2 off! 
Click on link below.





Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
Get More Genealogy Real Estate genealogy real estate JOIN 8 Genealogy Websites


Tuesday, August 1, 2017

Bundle your Genealogy Subscription and Save Money

Subscribe to 8 Genealogy Websites this week and receive the benefit of a subscription for 18 months, instead of 12.  Please Click
Become a Member





Thursday, July 20, 2017

Families Traced in AL GA KY NC SC TN VA #genealogy



Georgia Pioneers.com is pleased to announce the addition of genealogy databases and images in the States of : Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Included are wills, estates, bibles, cemeteries, pensions, obituaries, and more.  To subscribe now click on the link below (or copy it into your browser)


Subscribe here

Monday, June 26, 2017

Three Ships Sailed for Charleston in 1669; but Only One Reached Charleston #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy


The Ship "Carolina" Survives Hurricanes and Reaches Charleston in 1669

Map of Ashley and Cooper RiversIn 1669 the Lords Proprietaries sent out from England three ships, the Carolina, the Port Royal, and the Albemarle, with about a hundred colonists aboard. They sailed the old sea road which took them first to Barbados. At was at Barbados that the Albemarle was caught in a storm, and wrecked. But there was more trouble ahead. As the other two ships, with a Barbados sloop, sailed on anal approached the Bahamas, the Port Royal was destroyed by another hurricane. The Carolina, however, pushed on with the sloop, reached Bermuda, and rested there. Then, with a small ship purchased in these islands, she turned west by south and came in March of 1670 to the good harbor of Port Royal, South Carolina. Southward, the Spaniards held old Florida where the town of St. Augustine had flourished since the 16th century. From this vantage, the Spanish could easily descend upon the English newcomers. The colonists debated the situation and decided to set some further space between them and lands of Spain. So the ships put out again to sea, beating northward a few leagues until it entered a harbor into which emptied two rivers, the Ashley and the Cooper. After going up the Ashley they were able to anchor and the colonists went ashore. On the west bank of the river, they began to build a town which for the King they named Charles Town. Ten years later this place was abandoned in favor of the more convenient point of land between the two rivers. Colonists came fast to this Carolina lying south. Barbados sent many; England, Scotland, and Ireland contributed a share; there came Huguenots from France, and a certain number of Germans. Ten years later the population numbered twelve hundred, and continued to increase. The early times were taken up with the wrestle with the forest, with the Indians, with Spanish alarms, with incompetent governors, with the Lords Proprietaries' Fundamental Constitutions, and with the restrictions which English Navigation Laws imposed upon English colonies. What grains and vegetables and tobacco they could grow, what cattle and swine they could breed and export, preoccupied the minds of these pioneer farmers. There were struggling for growth a rough agriculture and a hampered trade with Barbados, Virginia, and New England trade likewise with the buccaneers who swarmed in the West Indian waters. Free bootery was allowed to flourish in American seas. Gross governmental faults, Navigation Acts, and a hundred petty and great oppressions, general poverty, adventurousness, lawlessness, and sympathy of mishandled folk with lawlessness, all combined to keep Brother of the Coast, Buccaneer, and Filibuster alive, and their ships upon all seas. Many were no worse than smugglers; others were robbers with violence; and a few had a dash of the fiend. All nations had buccaneers on the seas and the early settlers on these shores never violently disapproved of the pirate. He was often a "good fellow" who delivered needed articles without dues, easy to trade with, and had Spanish gold in his pouch. Pirates frequently came ashore to Charles Town, and they traded with him there. For this reason, at one time Charles Town got the name of "Rogue's Harbor." However, as better emigrants arrived and planted tobacco and wheat along the Ashley and Cooper rivers, the tone changed. But it was not until the final years of the seventeenth century that a ship touching at Charleston left there a bag of Madagascar rice. Planted, it gave increase that was planted again. Suddenly it was found that this was the crop for low-lying Carolina. Rice became her staple, as was tobacco of Virginia. For the rice fields and system of large plantations, an aristocratic structure embraced Charles Town. To escape heat and sickness, the planters of rice and indigo gave over to employees the care of their great holdings and lived themselves in pleasant Charleston. These plantations, with their great gangs of slaves under overseers, also had the indentured white laborers whose passage was paid for by English, who were promised fair freedom after a certain number of years. While the caste system was predominantly strong in England, the charters for the colonies provided an overplus power to grant liberty of conscience, although at home was a hot persecuting time. Thus, Huguenots, Independents, Quakers, dissenters of many kinds, found on the whole refuge and harbor in the colonies. Moreso than any of the other colonies, South Carolina had great plantations, a bustling town society, suave and polished, a learned clergy, an aristocratic cast to life. A place where the sea-line offered access to stretches of rivers to all vessels. 
Find your South Carolina Ancestors

Memberships has its benefits

SUBSCRIBE HERE

Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Friday, June 9, 2017

The Dutch Fork Settlement in South Carolina #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

The Dutch Fork Settlement

Dutch ForkThis part of the upcountry was settled by Germans, Scotch-Irish, English, and emigrants from the sister States of North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The German settlement was in the fork, between the Broad and Saluda Rivers to within three miles of the Newberry Court House. Soon thereafter the line was extended eight miles below Hugheys on the Broad River to the mouth of Bear Creek, on the Saluda River. Germans were so prevalent in part of Newberry County that it become known as Dutch Fork. Adam Summer, the father of Colonel John Adam Sumner, headed the settlement beginning in 1745. Colonel Sumner and Major Frederick Gray were known to be whigs. Among those settling were the religiously oppressed Palatines who were driven from the Rhine, Baden and Wurtemburg into England during 1710 where they were quartered in tents and booths near London. From there, they were sent to North Carolina and South Carolina. The first German settlers were: Summers, Mayer, Ruff, Eigleberger, Count, Sligh, Piester, Gray, DeWalt, Boozer, Busby, Buzzard, Shealy, Bedenbaugh, Cromer, Berley, Heller, Koon, Wingard, Suber, Folk, Dickert, Cappleman, Halfacres, Chapman, Black, Kinard, Bounight, Barr, Harmon, Bower, Kibler, Gallman, Lever, Hartman, Frick, Stoudemoyer, Dominick, Singley, Bulow, Paysinger, Wallern, Stayley, Ridlehoover, Librand, Leaphart, Hopes, Houseal, Bernhard, Shuler, Haltiwanger, Swigart, Meetze, Schumpert, Fulmore, Livingston, Schmitz, Eleazer, Drehr, Lorick, Wise, Crotwell, Youngener, Nunamaker, Souter, Epting and Huffman. The Quakers settled on the Bush River and the Beaverdam about three or four miles on each side of the river. Among them was William Coate who resided between Spring Field and the Bush River and Samuel elly, a native of King County, Ireland, who came to Newberry from Camden to settle at Spring Field. Others were: John Furnas, David Jenkins, Benjamin Pearson, William Pearson, Peter Hare, Robert Evans, John Wright, Joseph Wright, William Wright, James Brooks, Joseph Thomson, James Patty, Gabriel McCoole, John Coate, (Big) Isaac Hollingsworth, William O Neall, Walter Herbert, Sr., Daniel Parkins, Daniel Smith, Samuel Miles, David Miles, William Miles, Samuel Brown, Israel Gaunt, Azariah Pugh, William Mills, Jonathan and Caleb Gilbert, John Galbreath, James Coppock, John Coppock, Joseph Reagin, John Reagin, Abel and James Insco, Jesse Spray, Samuel Teague, George Pemberton, Jehu Inman, Mercer Babb, James Steddam, John Crumpton, Isaac Cook, John Jay , Reason Reagen, Thomas and Isaac Hasket, Thomas Pearson, Enoch Pearson, Samuel Pearson, Nehemiah Thomas, Abel Thomas, Timothy Thomas, Euclydus Longshore, Sarah Duncan, Samuel Duncan and John Duncan. 

Find your South Carolina Ancestors

Memberships has its benefits

SUBSCRIBE HERE

Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



Click on Subscribe

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Anderson Co. SC Wills and Estates #genealogy #southcarolinapioneersnet

Anderson County Wills, Estates

AshtabulaAndersonAndersonIn 1777 after Cherokee Indians signed a treaty ceding its lands to the state, part of theIndian Land became known as Pendleton District (the old deeds also refer to it as the Washington District). In 1790, the town was Pendleton was founded, later becoming a popular summer resort for low country planters in the nineteenth century. In 1826 Pendleton district was divided into Pickens and Anderson Counties. Anderson County was named after the Revolutionary War General Robert Anderson (1741-1812). Most of the early settlers of this area were Scotch-Irish farmers who moved south from Pennsylvania and Virginia in the eighteenth century. 

Early settlers: Drennan, Cox, Morris, Bruster, Watkins, Sego, Chappell, Thompson, Stephens, Hammond, Willson, Tatum, Leonard, Reeves, Neel, Hamilton, Rainey, Herring, Trotter, Rosamon, Morrow, Anderson, Russell, Lawrence, Shelton, Douthit, Dilworth and Pickens. 

Wills, Estates, Documents Available toMembers of South Carolina Pioneers 
  • Anderson County Will Book A (Abstracts)
  • Map of Anderson County
  • Anderson County Will Book A (Abstracts)
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book A (1791-1834)
    Digital Images of Original Will Documents: Names of Testators: Compton, James; Corben, Peter;Dalrumple, Samuel;Findly, Samuel;Gantt, Giles;Gibson, Randolph;Harris, James S., LWT (1831); Major, Elijah, estate (1865);Perkins, Isaac;Pickens, Robert; Pollack, John;Shelton, Lewis;Simms, James;Sinkler, Charles; Smith, John;Thompson, James;Thompson, Mathew;West, Jonathan
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book B 1835-1845
    Digital Images of Original Will Documents: Testators: Alexander, Aaron; Bowie, Charles;Bowie, Wesley; Brown, George;Browne, Elijah;Buchanan, Ebenezer; Burriss, James;Burriss, John;Burt, Francis; Burt, Moody;Carson, James;Clarke, Matthew;Clinkscales, Francis; Clinkscales, Levi;Corr, John;Cox, William;Cox, William(2); Dalrymple, Sarah; Dean, Gwinney;Earle, John; Elliott, William; Elliott, William (2);Elrod, Isaac; Elrod, Jeremiah;Emerson, Samuel; Fant, Jesse;Forsythe, William; Gentry, John;Gillison, Archibald; Goode, Lewelling;Gordon, Robert;Griffin, James;Guttry, David; Guyton, Aaron;Guyton, Robert;Harper, John; Harper, William; Harris, James; Harris, John; Harris, Nathaniel; Ingram, John; Jennings, John; Johnson, John; Junkin, Margaret; Junkin, Robert; Kelly, Elisha; Keown, William; Lewis, Eleanor; Lewis, Sarah; Linley, John; Major, Joseph; Martin, David; Martin, David (2); Mason, Ambrose; McAllister, Nathan;McCoy, James; McCurday, William; McFee, Samuel;McGee, Jesse;McGill, Samuel; McLin, Hugh; Milford, John; Miller, Crosby; Mills, Elizabeth; Moorhead, John; Morris, John; O'Briant, Jesse; Oldham, George; Poole, Robert; Poor, Hugh; Pressly, Rachel; Pritchard, William; Ragsdale, Frances; Ralston, Robert; Reese, George; Richardson, Turner; Ritchie, John; Scott, James; Scuddy, Agustine; Sherrill, Lewis;Smith, John; Stanton, George; Stegall, Hensley;Stevenson, Joseph; Storey, Charles;Todd, Robert; Tucker, Bartley; Turpin, William; Warren, Samuel; Warnock, James; Warnock, John; Watson, David; Watson, David(2); Watson, Thomas; Webster, James; Williams, Stephen; Wilson, James; Wilson, Ralph; Winter, Dinah; Wright, Larkin
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book C 1791-1798
  • Map of Anderson County 

  • Find your South Carolina Ancestors

    Memberships has its benefits

    SUBSCRIBE HERE

    Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



    Click on Subscribe

    Monday, March 6, 2017

    Settlers to Goose Creek SC #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

    Goose Creek
    By Jeannette Holland Austin

    Goose CreekSettlement of Goose Creek began ca 1671 with planters from Barbados bringing slave labor into the area. Some of the notable Goose Creek Plantations included Medway, Yeamans Hall, Windsor Hill, The Elms, Otranto, Martindales, The Oaks,Crowfield, Liberty Hall, Howe Hall and Brick Hope.

    Find your South Carolina Ancestors

    Memberships has its benefits

    SUBSCRIBE HERE

    Become a Member Click on Bundle and Save



    Click on Subscribe