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Friday, February 12, 2016

How the Scotch-Irish Settled in Chester, South Carolina #southcarolinapioneers.net #genealogy

South Carolina Pioneers

Chester County Probate Records


downtown Chester

Chester County and its county seat, the town of Chester, were named for Chester County, Pennsylvania. The county was formed in 1785 as part of the larger Camden District but was later transferred to Pinckney District (1791-1800); it became a separate district in 1800. Scotch-Irish settlers from Pennsylvania and Virginia moved into this upstate region beginning about 1755. During the Revolutionary War, American forces under General Thomas Sumter were defeated here at the battle of Fishing Creek in August 1780; the Americans were victorious at Fishdam Ford in November of the same year. The Landsford Canal was built in 1823 to allow boats and barges to bypass rapids on the Catawba River; this canal is now open as a state park. In later years the availability of hydroelectric power encouraged the establishment of textile mills in the area. South Carolina governor, United States senator, and judge Donald S. Russell (1906-1998) lived in Chester as a boy.

Early settlers: Price, Akin, Hamilton, Love, Boyd, Featherstone, Griffin, Love, Cherry, Harbison, Dugan, Bell, OBrient, Grisholm, Head, Roden, Hatfield, McLonen, Jordan, Owens, McDaniel, McCannon, McDonald, Harper and Cabean, William Bell.

Chester County Records Available for Members of South Carolina Pioneers
    Chester County Will Book A (1779-1797)
    Chester County Will Book B (1792-1802
    Chester County Will Book C (1803-1805)
    Index to Chester County Will Book (1789-1819)
    Index to Chester County Will Book A (1789-1817)
    Index to Chester County Will Book E (1810-1814)
    Index to Chester County Will Book F (1817)
    Index to Chester County Will Book F-2 (1815-1817)
    Index to Chester County Will Book G (1817-1822)
    Index to Chester County Will Book H (1820-1825)
    Index to Chester County Will Book I (1824-1826)
    Index to Chester County Will Book J (1826-1828)
    Index to Chester County Will Book K (1829-1831)
    Index to Chester County Will Book L (1832-1833)
    Index to Chester County Will Book P (1838-1839)
    Index to Chester County Will Book 3 (1833-1853)

    Chester County Will Book A (1779-1795), Transcripts
    Testators: Archer, Alexander;Archer, William;Attabery, William;Bell, John; Bond, Isom;Bradford, Robert;Braidy, Alexander;Brown, James;Brown, Katharine;Carter, Benjamin;Colvin, John;Cooper, Hugh;Crosby, Richard; Crosby, Thomas;Culp, Peter;Dods, John;Donly, Hugh;Flemming, John; Franklin, Thomas;Gaston, John;Gill, John;Gore, Elizabeth;Haroer, Daniel;Henderson, Edward;Hitchcock, John;Hitchcock, John(2);Hughes, Thomas;Kidd, John;Knox, John;Loveing, Christopher;Marrick, John; Martin, William;McDonald, Timothy;McKinney, Patrick;Moffet, William; Moor, James;Moor, James;Morris, Thomas;Neely, James;Nisbet, James; Quinton, Samuel;Rainey, Robert;Rives, Nathaniel;Roberson, James; Rogers, John;Sadler, Isaac;Sealey, John;Sleeker, George;Steavenson, David;Steel, James;Stephenson, James;Stewart, RobertStrong, James; Taylor, William;Walker, John;Walker, Robert;Wall, Drury;Weer, William; Weir, William (2)

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Jeannette Holland AustinHow the Scotch-Irish Settled in Chester, South Carolina
By Jeannette Holland Austin

During the Royal Period, there was a great migration of Scottish and Irish persons into South Carolina. They through the Charleston Port, as well as that in Philadelphia, laying over in Bucks County. But the Indian raids along the Pennsylvania frontier presented problems, and many Scots-Irish took to the Great Wagon Road from Pennsylvania through the Shenandoah valley, down to North Carolina and South Carolina. The Scotch-Irish virtually settled the back country of South Carolina before the Revolutionary War. The greater portion of the were Protestant. The Irish in Northern Ireland came down a little later. Here is an example of a plain Irish family migrating from Ireland into Pennsylvania an finally to Chester, South Carolina. According to his pension, William Boyd was born in Ireland and brought to Charleston, South Carolina by his father when he was five years old. He was just fifteen years old when he enlisted as a substitute for his father in the Revolutionary War and served four months, then three months as a private in the South Carolina Troops under Lt. Archibald Gill, Colonel Lacy, Colonel Thomas Taylor and Colonel Bratton. Although he appears to have only substituted in the war, his widow applied for a pension.

Purity Presbyterian Church
Ol Purity Presbyterian Church ca 1787 (now Catholic) has burials dating back to the Revolutionary War.

church marker

Apparently there were a fair number of Scotch-Irish settlements near Chester, since those persons in the region today appear to be descendants. Ultimately, most of these families were involved in the Revolutionary War.

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  • The Humiliating Defeat of General Gates at Camden, SC - Kershaw Co. Wills, Estates #southcarolinapioneers.net
    Kershaw County Probate Records Kershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County Index to Kershaw County…
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Thursday, February 11, 2016

Battle of Cowpens


The Battle of Cowpens

By Jeannette Holland Austin
South Carolina Pioneers

Jeannette Holland Austin
Jeannette Holland Austin
This battle is regarded as one of the most brilliantly executed in history! On one side we have the guerrilla fighter General Daniel Morgan and on the other, Lt. General Banastre Tarleton, well-deserving of his title "the butcher." On January 17, 1781 the Continental Army troops and colonial militia under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan decisively defeated a British force known as the "Black Legion" led by Lt. Colonel Banastre Tarleton. Tarleton had quickly made himself famous by taking unfair advantages of the enemy, and butchering them after they waved the white flag. Hence, the name " the butcher" However, General Morgan was no patsy and sorely defeated the British, leaving 110 dead, over 200 wounded and 500 captured. The battle took place on the site Hannahs cowpens and in an open pasture. The flat land accomodated the european-style of combat, with each army facing one another.

Tarleton was 26 years old and had served with distinction at the Siege of Charleston and the Battle of Camden. Commanding the British Legion, a mixed infantry/cavalry force composed of American Loyalists who constituted some of the best British troops in the Carolinas, Tarleton won decisive victories at Moncks Corner and Fishing Creek. He became infamous among Patriots after his victory at the Battle of Waxhaws. His men had killed American soldiers after they had surrendered. But Tarleton excused it by saying that his horse had been shot out from underneath him during the initial charge and that his men, thinking him dead, engaged in "a vindictive asperity not easily restrained." Afterwards, Tarleton and the Legion marched to Ninety Six and upon learning that Morgan was not there, he decided to pursue. Lord Cornwallis sent the reinforcements requested and Tarleton set out with his enlarged command to drive Morgan across the Broad River. On January 12th, he received word of the Morgan's location. Now drove his men into a hard march and commanded them to build boats to cross rivers which were flooded by winter rains. When Morgan heard that Tarleton was in pusuit, he retreated north to avoid being trappe between Tarleton and Cornwallis.

On January 16th, aware that Tarleton was close, Morgan approached the Broad River, which was high with flood waters. By nightfall he reached a place called the Cowpens, a well-known grazing area for local cattle. Pickens, who had been patrolling, arrived that evening with a large body of militia. Morgan decided to stand and fight rather than continue to retreat and risk being caught by Tarleton while fording the Broad River. But Tarleton denied his troops camp, pushing them to march throughout the night. 

Battle of Cowpens

Daniel Morgan used the landscape of Cowpens, the reliability of his troops, the assumptions of his opponents and the time afforded him before the arrival of Tarleton to his advantage. He was aware that untrained militiamen comprised a large portion of his force and that the Battle of Camden had ended in disaster when the militia, which was half of the American force, broke and ran as soon as the shooting started. To eliminate that possibility, he stationed his army between the Broad and Pacolet Rivers, selecting a low hill as the center of his position for the infantry and deliberately leaving his flanks exposed. With a ravine on their right flank and a creek on their left flank, Morgan reasoned his forces were protected against British flanking maneuvers at the beginning of the battle. 

Meanwhile, the British pushed forward expecting success. Just before sunrise, Tarletons van came out of the woods in front of the Americans and he ordered his dragoons to attack the first line of skirmishers who opened fire. They shot fifteen dragoons while the others retreated. Tarleton quickly ordered an infantry charge before the remainder of his infantry and cavalry could make it out of the woods. He then used his main body to attack the skirmish line, but the American skirmishers kept firing as they fell back to join the second line of the Pickens Militia. The British attacked again, this time reaching the militiamen but were surprised when two volleys were fired upon them. This tactic confused the British officers. They regrouped and continued advancing. Tarleton ordered one of his officers to charge into the "defeated" Americans. His men moved forward in regular formation and were momentarily checked by the militia musket fire but continued to advance while Pickens militia moved around behind and prepared to fire off their second volley. The British took the Americans withdrawal of its first two lines to mean that they were retreating and commenced advancing headlong into the third and final line of the regulars who were awaiting them on the hill. The British Highlanders were ordered to flank the American right but that flanking movement was observed by John Eager Howard who ordered his Virginia militiamen to turn and face the Scots. However, in the noise of battle the order which Howar gave was misunderstood and the militiamen began to withdraw. It was almost 7:45 a.m. when the weary British who had marched all night, became tired and disorganized. When they saw the militia withdrawing, they assumed that the Americans were on the run. So they broke formation and charged. Morgan ordered a volley. The Howard militia stopped their running and made an about-face. The Virginians fired, causing the confused British to lurch to a dead halt. John Eager Howard shouted, "Charge bayonets!" The Continentals mounted a bayonet charge upon the weary british who surrendered and ran. Meanwhile, while the cavalry of William Washington hit the British on their right flank and rear, the Pickens militia charged out from behind the hill and encircled the British highlanders. Then Howard ordered the Virginia militia to turn about and attack the Scots from the other direction. 

Nearly half of the British and Loyalist infantrymen fell to the ground whether they were wounded. Their exhaustion was complete. But Tarleton rode back to his Legion Cavalry and ordered them to charge, but they refused and ran off the field instead. The Highlanders, now surrounded by militia and Continentals, surrendered. Desperate to save something, Tarleton found about forty cavalrymen and attempted to save two cannons, but they were gone. He then rode back into the fight, but after clashing with Washington, also retreated from the field. He was stopped by Washington, who attacked him with his saber and shouted "Where is now the boasting Tarleton?" The whole battle had only lasted one hour! 

Cherokee County SC Genealogy

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Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Tories Threaten to Hang Patriot #southcarolinapioneers.net #scgenealogy

South Carolina Pioneers

Greenville County Probate Records

Greenville, SC Greenville County originally belonged to the Cherokee Indians, until 1777 when they ceded their lands to the state and English and Scotch-Irish settlers began settling. Greenville District was created in 1786, but from 1791 to 1800 it was part of the larger Washington District. The county seat was originally named Pleasantburg, but in 1831 the name was changed to Greenville. Early settlers: Arnold Russell, William Henry Lyttleton, Frederick Winter, Jesse Saxon, John Robinson, Evan Thomas, George Salmon, Wiat Anderson, John Holland, General Nathaniel Greene (1742-1786) and others.

Greenville County Probate Records available to members of South Carolina Pioneers

Images of Greenville County Wills 1787 to 1818
  • Arnold, Benjamin, LWT
  • Ayres, John
  • Barrett, Reubin (1812)
  • Benson, Elizabeth
  • Benson, Prue, LWT
  • Bots, Moon, LWT
  • Bradley, Abraham, LWT
  • Chastain, Abraham, estate (1845)
  • Chandler, Joel, LWT
  • Collins, John, LWT
  • Cooley, Jacob
  • Cox, John, LWT
  • Crain, Judith, LWT
  • Crayton, Thomas, LWT
  • Darrach, Hugh, LWT
  • Dill, John, LWT (1807)
  • Dill, Stephen, LWT (1839)
  • Duncan, Sally, LWT
  • Dunn, Benjamin
  • Dyer, Samuel, LWT
  • Edwards, John, LWT
  • Edwards, Sally
  • Fisher, Nicholas, LWT
  • Ford, Mary, LWT
  • Ford, John, LWT
  • Forest, Jeremiah, LWT
  • Forrester, James, LWT
  • Foster, John, LWT
  • Gaston, William
  • Goodlett, David, LWT
  • Goodlett, Hiram, LWT
  • Goodlett, Robert
  • Grace, Joel
  • Hackson, William
  • Hanes, Henry
  • Harrison, John, LWT
  • Hawkins, Eaton
  • Hawkins, Joshua, LWT
  • Hethcoth, Isaac
  • Howard, Edward, LWT
  • Howard, John, LWT
  • Hunt, William, LWT
  • Jackson, Elizabeth
  • Janes, Joseph, LWT
  • Jenkins, Micajah, LWT
  • Johnson, Hannah
  • Kelly, Samuel
  • Kemp, Richard, LWT
  • Kilgore, James
  • King, Edward
  • Kirby, Francis, LWT
  • Landrith, John
  • Langley, Carter, LWT
  • Langston, John, LWT
  • Lester, Archibald, LWT
  • Loveless, Isaac, LWT
  • Machen, Henry, LWT
  • Martin, George
  • Mathers, William, LWT
  • McClanahan, William, LWT (1802) transcript
  • McCleland, James
  • McCrary, James, LWT
  • McDaniel, John
  • McVicar, Adam, LWT
  • Moon, John, LWT (1839), transcript
  • Moon, William, LWT (1835), transcript
  • Morgan, Isaac, LWT
  • Nelson, Robert
  • Owens, William, LWT
  • Payne, Isaiah, LWT
  • Payne, Thomas, LWT
  • Peden, John, LWT
  • Peden, John Sr., LWT
  • Peden, William, LWT
  • Pickett, Micajah, LWT
  • Pike, Lewis, LWT, transcript, 1819
  • Praytor, Middleton
  • Reece, Travace
  • Roberts, Hardy, LWT
  • Roe, James, LWT
  • Rogers, John, LWT
  • Sammons, John
  • Seaborn, George
  • Ship, William
  • Simmons, John
  • Sims, Drury, LWT
  • Smith, Alexander, LWT
  • Smith, Abner, LWT
  • Smith, Reubin, LWT
  • Sparks, Jesse, LWT
  • Stone, Mary LWT
  • Stone, Jonathan
  • Tarrant, Benjamin, LWT (1808)
  • Tarrant, John, LWT
  • Taylor, John, LWT
  • Thomas, William
  • Thompson, John, LWT
  • Thompson, Josiah
  • Thackston, William, LWT
  • Thrasher, Thomas, LWT
  • Turner, William
  • Vinson, Ezekiel
  • Waddill, Charles
  • Waddill, Edmund, LWT, image (1850)
  • Walker, Sylvanus
  • Welch, William, LWT
  • Wells, Samuel, LWT
  • Wickliff, Isaac, LWT
  • Wolfe, George
  • Wynne, Matthew, LWT
  • Yeargin, Andrew
  • Yeargin, Orgin
  • Young, John, LWT
  • Young, William, LWT
Digital Images of Inventories and Appraisements 1825 to 1829
  • Avery, Charles
  • Benson, Robert
  • Bradford, Philemon
  • Brooks, George
  • Brown, William
  • Clark, William
  • Cole, Ira
  • Cook, Nancy
  • Cooley, Jacob
  • Cowan, Francis
  • Crayton, Samuel
  • Croft, Frederick
  • Farr, James
  • Foster, Robert
  • Goldsmith, John
  • Hall, Merry
  • Loveless, Isaac
  • McClemons, Hugh
  • McCreary, Andrew
  • McJunkin, Daniel
  • Montgomery, Alexander
  • Moon, Samuel
  • Morgan, Jesse
  • Moseley, James
  • Nabors, Samuel
  • Nelson, Elisha
  • Pegalot, William
  • Ponder, James
  • Pool, Irvin P.
  • Rae, James
  • Rea, William
  • Rector, Lewis
  • Sloan, Alexander
  • Smith, Jeremiah
  • Sowel, Deadamia
  • Stoke, Levi
  • Stokes, Thomas
  • Stone, Mary
  • Sullivan, Charles
  • Taylor, John
  • Terry, Burksdale
  • Thurston, David
  • Towns, Samuel
  • Waddill, Charles
  • Welch, William
  • Westfield, John Jr.
  • Westmoreland, John
  • Young, William
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Tory Threatens to Hang Patriot
By Jeannette Holland Austin

Reuben Harrison served with Colonel Richardson Owens during the Revolutionary War. He was sent from Flower Gap in Surry County, North Carolina by Colonel Owens with a letter to Colonel Benjamin Cleveland advising Cleveland when he would advance upon the Tories. Enroute, he was captured by the Tories and mistreated. They threatened to hang him. A Tory by the name of George Roberts took him into his arms and shaking him, told him that he would be hanged if he did not disclose his business. But his step-son, a young man, interceded that persuaded the Tory to release Harrison because of his youth. He had hidden the letter in the crown of his hat, and although the Tories removed it, did not see it. Therefore, Harrison was released and went on to deliver the letter to Colonel Cleveland before returning to Flower Gap.

Revolutionary War Pensions provide a great deal of personal information about the soldiers as well as battles. They are certainly worth studying and using to piece together family puzzles.

Map of Greenville County

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  • The Humiliating Defeat of General Gates at Camden, SC - Kershaw Co. Wills, Estates #southcarolinapioneers.net
    Kershaw County Probate Records Kershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County Index to Kershaw County…
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Tuesday, February 9, 2016

The Role that the Welsh Neck Baptist Church Played in SC #southcarolinapioneers #genealogy

South Carolina Pioneers

Darlington County SC Wills and Estates

Hartsville, South Carolina Summerford FarmsA home in Hartsville and Summerford Farms in Darlington, County. Darlington County was formed in 1785. The county seat is situated in Darlington. It was originally part of the Cheraw District, and later (1888) part of it was given for Florence County and again in (1902) to Lee County. Traditionally, Welsh, Scotch-Irish, and Englishmen farmed this land and ultimately planted cotton. Some early settlers were : David Rogerson Williams (1776-1830), Governor and scientific experimenter, James Lide Coker (1837-1918), Moses Scott, Absalom Gallaway and David R. Coker (1870-1938).

Probate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers

Indexes to Probate Records
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 3 (1813)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 4 (1814-1840)
  • Index to Darlington County Will Book 10 (1838-1853)
Darlington County Will Book 1 (1785-1797); Digital Images of Transcripts
  • Gallaway, Absalom
  • James, William
  • Scott, Moses
  • Webb, Jolly
Darlington County Will Book 2 (1798-1812); Digital Images of Transcripts
  • Beasley, John
  • Berry, William
  • Cannon, George
  • Cole, James
  • Connell, William
  • Cuttino, Elizabeth
  • DeWitt, Charles
  • Fountain, William
  • Ganey, Isaac
  • Gee, William
  • Hafe, John
  • Hafe, John (2)
  • Ham, Henry
  • Harrell, John
  • Harts, James
  • Hatchel, Morris
  • Hixon, Thomas
  • Kimbrough, Hannah
  • Mackintosh, John
  • McBride, Archibald
  • McBride, Sally
  • McCall, John
  • Mercer, Jesse
  • Mikell, Anne
  • Mixon, Mica
  • Muldrow, William
  • Nettles, Zachariah
  • Newberry, Jesse
  • Orr, John
  • Pawley, James
  • Pugh, Evan
  • Trivitt, Elliott
  • Revell, Matthew
  • Russell, James Jr.
  • Russell, Michael
  • Russell, Michael (2)
  • Sanders, Nathaniel
  • Smith, John
  • Stanley, Thomas
  • Teele, Christopher
  • Thomas, Solomon
  • Thornhill, John
  • Wilds, Mary, Mrs.
  • Wingate, Edward
  • Wood, Joseph
  • Wright, Benjamin
Darlington County Wills, Book 3 (1813); digital images of transcripts
  • Brown, Jesse
  • Parnal, James


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Jeannette Holland AustinThe Role that Welsh Neck Baptist Church Played in South Carolina
By Jeannette Holland Austin

In 1737, a colony of Welsh from the Welsh Tract in Germantown, Pennsylvania (now Delaware) settled along the east bank of the Pee Dee River. A year later this colony of people met and organized themselves into a Baptist church, known as the Welsh Neck Baptist Church. It is said that the original church was built at Long Bluff (near Society Hill) on the bank of the Pee Dee River to the right of a public road leading from Bennettsville to Society Hill.

A fieldstone in the old Cashaway Baptist Church graveyard near the site of Cashaway Ferry, marks the resting place of Colonel Abel Kolb, a Revolutionary patriot and officer who was slain by Tories in 1781 while standing on the porch of his mansion. The British occupied most of the backcountry as well as the port of Charleston and this was the time when General Nathaniel Greene was preparing his attack on Ninety-Six. The Revolutionary War Pension of Colonel Kolb reflects that the Kolb family from Germany arrived in the country during 1707 and settled around Germantown in Pennsylvania. Four Kolb brothers, sons of Dielman Kolb and his wife, a Shumacher (shoe maker)of Manheim in Germany, were named Martin, Johannes, Jacob, and Henry. A fifth brother, Deilman, arrived in 1717. Johannes Kolb left Pennsylvania about 1737 and settled on the south bank of the Great Pee Dee River, called Kolb's Neck and located below present-day Society Hill. Johannes Kolb was the father of nine children, including Peter Kolb, the father of Abel Kolb. An early minister of the church was Reverend Philip James from Wales. The Surviving membership rolls reflect the first organizers, plus dates from 1759 to 1780s and reflect German and Scottish names. Two McIver families transferred their membership from Scotland on the rolls. The present-day cemetery appears to have started its burials about 1850 and also reveals a number of Scottish names. The surviving Membership Rolls listed under Churches on South Carolina Pioneers

Map of Darlington County

Coker House
Caleb Coker House build ca 1832

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  • The Humiliating Defeat of General Gates at Camden, SC - Kershaw Co. Wills, Estates #southcarolinapioneers.net
    Kershaw County Probate Records Kershaw County was originally part of Camden District, and was formed in 1791 from Claremont, Lancaster, Fairfield and Richland Counties. It was named for Joseph Kershaw (1727-1791). The county seat is Camden. Camden was first settled in about 1732 by the English who'd settled first in Charleston. Camden was occupied by the Revolutionary War from June of 1780 to May of 1781. Battle of Camden, South Carolina during the Revolutionary War. South Carolina Wills and Estate Records Available to Members of South Carolina Pioneers Map of Plantations in Lower Kershaw County Index to Kershaw County…
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