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Thursday, November 9, 2017

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Genealogy Records in Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia
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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

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Thursday, July 20, 2017

Families Traced in AL GA KY NC SC TN VA #genealogy



Georgia Pioneers.com is pleased to announce the addition of genealogy databases and images in the States of : Alabama, Georgia, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee and Virginia. Included are wills, estates, bibles, cemeteries, pensions, obituaries, and more.  To subscribe now click on the link below (or copy it into your browser)


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Monday, June 26, 2017

Three Ships Sailed for Charleston in 1669; but Only One Reached Charleston #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy


The Ship "Carolina" Survives Hurricanes and Reaches Charleston in 1669

Map of Ashley and Cooper RiversIn 1669 the Lords Proprietaries sent out from England three ships, the Carolina, the Port Royal, and the Albemarle, with about a hundred colonists aboard. They sailed the old sea road which took them first to Barbados. At was at Barbados that the Albemarle was caught in a storm, and wrecked. But there was more trouble ahead. As the other two ships, with a Barbados sloop, sailed on anal approached the Bahamas, the Port Royal was destroyed by another hurricane. The Carolina, however, pushed on with the sloop, reached Bermuda, and rested there. Then, with a small ship purchased in these islands, she turned west by south and came in March of 1670 to the good harbor of Port Royal, South Carolina. Southward, the Spaniards held old Florida where the town of St. Augustine had flourished since the 16th century. From this vantage, the Spanish could easily descend upon the English newcomers. The colonists debated the situation and decided to set some further space between them and lands of Spain. So the ships put out again to sea, beating northward a few leagues until it entered a harbor into which emptied two rivers, the Ashley and the Cooper. After going up the Ashley they were able to anchor and the colonists went ashore. On the west bank of the river, they began to build a town which for the King they named Charles Town. Ten years later this place was abandoned in favor of the more convenient point of land between the two rivers. Colonists came fast to this Carolina lying south. Barbados sent many; England, Scotland, and Ireland contributed a share; there came Huguenots from France, and a certain number of Germans. Ten years later the population numbered twelve hundred, and continued to increase. The early times were taken up with the wrestle with the forest, with the Indians, with Spanish alarms, with incompetent governors, with the Lords Proprietaries' Fundamental Constitutions, and with the restrictions which English Navigation Laws imposed upon English colonies. What grains and vegetables and tobacco they could grow, what cattle and swine they could breed and export, preoccupied the minds of these pioneer farmers. There were struggling for growth a rough agriculture and a hampered trade with Barbados, Virginia, and New England trade likewise with the buccaneers who swarmed in the West Indian waters. Free bootery was allowed to flourish in American seas. Gross governmental faults, Navigation Acts, and a hundred petty and great oppressions, general poverty, adventurousness, lawlessness, and sympathy of mishandled folk with lawlessness, all combined to keep Brother of the Coast, Buccaneer, and Filibuster alive, and their ships upon all seas. Many were no worse than smugglers; others were robbers with violence; and a few had a dash of the fiend. All nations had buccaneers on the seas and the early settlers on these shores never violently disapproved of the pirate. He was often a "good fellow" who delivered needed articles without dues, easy to trade with, and had Spanish gold in his pouch. Pirates frequently came ashore to Charles Town, and they traded with him there. For this reason, at one time Charles Town got the name of "Rogue's Harbor." However, as better emigrants arrived and planted tobacco and wheat along the Ashley and Cooper rivers, the tone changed. But it was not until the final years of the seventeenth century that a ship touching at Charleston left there a bag of Madagascar rice. Planted, it gave increase that was planted again. Suddenly it was found that this was the crop for low-lying Carolina. Rice became her staple, as was tobacco of Virginia. For the rice fields and system of large plantations, an aristocratic structure embraced Charles Town. To escape heat and sickness, the planters of rice and indigo gave over to employees the care of their great holdings and lived themselves in pleasant Charleston. These plantations, with their great gangs of slaves under overseers, also had the indentured white laborers whose passage was paid for by English, who were promised fair freedom after a certain number of years. While the caste system was predominantly strong in England, the charters for the colonies provided an overplus power to grant liberty of conscience, although at home was a hot persecuting time. Thus, Huguenots, Independents, Quakers, dissenters of many kinds, found on the whole refuge and harbor in the colonies. Moreso than any of the other colonies, South Carolina had great plantations, a bustling town society, suave and polished, a learned clergy, an aristocratic cast to life. A place where the sea-line offered access to stretches of rivers to all vessels. 
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Friday, June 9, 2017

The Dutch Fork Settlement in South Carolina #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

The Dutch Fork Settlement

Dutch ForkThis part of the upcountry was settled by Germans, Scotch-Irish, English, and emigrants from the sister States of North Carolina, Virginia and Pennsylvania. The German settlement was in the fork, between the Broad and Saluda Rivers to within three miles of the Newberry Court House. Soon thereafter the line was extended eight miles below Hugheys on the Broad River to the mouth of Bear Creek, on the Saluda River. Germans were so prevalent in part of Newberry County that it become known as Dutch Fork. Adam Summer, the father of Colonel John Adam Sumner, headed the settlement beginning in 1745. Colonel Sumner and Major Frederick Gray were known to be whigs. Among those settling were the religiously oppressed Palatines who were driven from the Rhine, Baden and Wurtemburg into England during 1710 where they were quartered in tents and booths near London. From there, they were sent to North Carolina and South Carolina. The first German settlers were: Summers, Mayer, Ruff, Eigleberger, Count, Sligh, Piester, Gray, DeWalt, Boozer, Busby, Buzzard, Shealy, Bedenbaugh, Cromer, Berley, Heller, Koon, Wingard, Suber, Folk, Dickert, Cappleman, Halfacres, Chapman, Black, Kinard, Bounight, Barr, Harmon, Bower, Kibler, Gallman, Lever, Hartman, Frick, Stoudemoyer, Dominick, Singley, Bulow, Paysinger, Wallern, Stayley, Ridlehoover, Librand, Leaphart, Hopes, Houseal, Bernhard, Shuler, Haltiwanger, Swigart, Meetze, Schumpert, Fulmore, Livingston, Schmitz, Eleazer, Drehr, Lorick, Wise, Crotwell, Youngener, Nunamaker, Souter, Epting and Huffman. The Quakers settled on the Bush River and the Beaverdam about three or four miles on each side of the river. Among them was William Coate who resided between Spring Field and the Bush River and Samuel elly, a native of King County, Ireland, who came to Newberry from Camden to settle at Spring Field. Others were: John Furnas, David Jenkins, Benjamin Pearson, William Pearson, Peter Hare, Robert Evans, John Wright, Joseph Wright, William Wright, James Brooks, Joseph Thomson, James Patty, Gabriel McCoole, John Coate, (Big) Isaac Hollingsworth, William O Neall, Walter Herbert, Sr., Daniel Parkins, Daniel Smith, Samuel Miles, David Miles, William Miles, Samuel Brown, Israel Gaunt, Azariah Pugh, William Mills, Jonathan and Caleb Gilbert, John Galbreath, James Coppock, John Coppock, Joseph Reagin, John Reagin, Abel and James Insco, Jesse Spray, Samuel Teague, George Pemberton, Jehu Inman, Mercer Babb, James Steddam, John Crumpton, Isaac Cook, John Jay , Reason Reagen, Thomas and Isaac Hasket, Thomas Pearson, Enoch Pearson, Samuel Pearson, Nehemiah Thomas, Abel Thomas, Timothy Thomas, Euclydus Longshore, Sarah Duncan, Samuel Duncan and John Duncan. 

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Anderson Co. SC Wills and Estates #genealogy #southcarolinapioneersnet

Anderson County Wills, Estates

AshtabulaAndersonAndersonIn 1777 after Cherokee Indians signed a treaty ceding its lands to the state, part of theIndian Land became known as Pendleton District (the old deeds also refer to it as the Washington District). In 1790, the town was Pendleton was founded, later becoming a popular summer resort for low country planters in the nineteenth century. In 1826 Pendleton district was divided into Pickens and Anderson Counties. Anderson County was named after the Revolutionary War General Robert Anderson (1741-1812). Most of the early settlers of this area were Scotch-Irish farmers who moved south from Pennsylvania and Virginia in the eighteenth century. 

Early settlers: Drennan, Cox, Morris, Bruster, Watkins, Sego, Chappell, Thompson, Stephens, Hammond, Willson, Tatum, Leonard, Reeves, Neel, Hamilton, Rainey, Herring, Trotter, Rosamon, Morrow, Anderson, Russell, Lawrence, Shelton, Douthit, Dilworth and Pickens. 

Wills, Estates, Documents Available toMembers of South Carolina Pioneers 
  • Anderson County Will Book A (Abstracts)
  • Map of Anderson County
  • Anderson County Will Book A (Abstracts)
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book A (1791-1834)
    Digital Images of Original Will Documents: Names of Testators: Compton, James; Corben, Peter;Dalrumple, Samuel;Findly, Samuel;Gantt, Giles;Gibson, Randolph;Harris, James S., LWT (1831); Major, Elijah, estate (1865);Perkins, Isaac;Pickens, Robert; Pollack, John;Shelton, Lewis;Simms, James;Sinkler, Charles; Smith, John;Thompson, James;Thompson, Mathew;West, Jonathan
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book B 1835-1845
    Digital Images of Original Will Documents: Testators: Alexander, Aaron; Bowie, Charles;Bowie, Wesley; Brown, George;Browne, Elijah;Buchanan, Ebenezer; Burriss, James;Burriss, John;Burt, Francis; Burt, Moody;Carson, James;Clarke, Matthew;Clinkscales, Francis; Clinkscales, Levi;Corr, John;Cox, William;Cox, William(2); Dalrymple, Sarah; Dean, Gwinney;Earle, John; Elliott, William; Elliott, William (2);Elrod, Isaac; Elrod, Jeremiah;Emerson, Samuel; Fant, Jesse;Forsythe, William; Gentry, John;Gillison, Archibald; Goode, Lewelling;Gordon, Robert;Griffin, James;Guttry, David; Guyton, Aaron;Guyton, Robert;Harper, John; Harper, William; Harris, James; Harris, John; Harris, Nathaniel; Ingram, John; Jennings, John; Johnson, John; Junkin, Margaret; Junkin, Robert; Kelly, Elisha; Keown, William; Lewis, Eleanor; Lewis, Sarah; Linley, John; Major, Joseph; Martin, David; Martin, David (2); Mason, Ambrose; McAllister, Nathan;McCoy, James; McCurday, William; McFee, Samuel;McGee, Jesse;McGill, Samuel; McLin, Hugh; Milford, John; Miller, Crosby; Mills, Elizabeth; Moorhead, John; Morris, John; O'Briant, Jesse; Oldham, George; Poole, Robert; Poor, Hugh; Pressly, Rachel; Pritchard, William; Ragsdale, Frances; Ralston, Robert; Reese, George; Richardson, Turner; Ritchie, John; Scott, James; Scuddy, Agustine; Sherrill, Lewis;Smith, John; Stanton, George; Stegall, Hensley;Stevenson, Joseph; Storey, Charles;Todd, Robert; Tucker, Bartley; Turpin, William; Warren, Samuel; Warnock, James; Warnock, John; Watson, David; Watson, David(2); Watson, Thomas; Webster, James; Williams, Stephen; Wilson, James; Wilson, Ralph; Winter, Dinah; Wright, Larkin
  • Index to Anderson County Will Book C 1791-1798
  • Map of Anderson County 

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    Monday, March 6, 2017

    Settlers to Goose Creek SC #southcarolinapioneersnet #genealogy

    Goose Creek
    By Jeannette Holland Austin

    Goose CreekSettlement of Goose Creek began ca 1671 with planters from Barbados bringing slave labor into the area. Some of the notable Goose Creek Plantations included Medway, Yeamans Hall, Windsor Hill, The Elms, Otranto, Martindales, The Oaks,Crowfield, Liberty Hall, Howe Hall and Brick Hope.

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    Sunday, March 5, 2017

    Revolutionary War Prisoners Taken to St. Augustine #southcarolinapioneersnet #revolutionarywar #genealogy

    Prisoners taken to St. Augustine, Florida

    Prisoners during Revolutionary WarWhen they were captured, South Carolina patriots and French allies were taken to St. Augustine, Florida where they were retained as prisoners of war. Three of the brave signers of the Declaration of Independence were from Charleston and included the persons of: Thomas Heyward, Jr., Arthur Middleton and Edward Rutledge. They were held until the end of 1780. Oddly enough, these prisoners of war were allowed the freedom of the streets and received good treatment from the Spani

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    Saturday, March 4, 2017

    Settlers to SC from Barbadoes #genealogy #history #southcarolinapioneersnet

    Inhabitants from Barbados Settled in South Carolina

    BarbadosEconomically South Carolina was associated with the West Indies where most of their trade came from. At the close of the 17th century, the white population was about 5500 persons, most of whom came from Barbados and other Caribbean Islands, as well as England, Ireland and France. They settled the area extending from the Santee to the mouth of the Edisto rivers, which included several of the islands, and reached back from the coast about fifty miles. The social and economic center was centered in Charleston. In the back country there were only two small towns and most of the inhabitants were located on plantations along the rivers and on the islands. The Barbadian planters had settled mainly on the Cooper River, Goose Creek, along the Ashley River and on the islands of James, John and Edisto. Four or five hundred Huguenots, most of whom had left their country because of the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, had located on the Santee, where they had received land grants aggregating over 50,000 acres. Almost half of this land grant was the property of two individuals, while other Huguenot estates varying from 100 to 3,000 acres. Rice is the crop which enriched the economy of Charleston and provided important staples both domestically and abroad. Early in the colony, a Swiss settlement south of Charleston tried the silk industry. The Barbadians brought slaves into Charleston where the harsh slave code of Barbados was adopted. 

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    Friday, March 3, 2017

    Trade Wars affecting Charleston SC & other Ports #history #southcarolinapioneersnet

    Trade Wars Between Spain and Great Britain
    By Jeannette Holland Austin. 

    ships"From Matanzas. We learn from Captain Lewis of the schoonerPlanter, arrived yesterday that the steamboat from Havana came down the evening before he sailed. He was informed that an embargo had been laid upon all Spanish vessels in that port and similar vessels in the port of Mantanzas. Captain Lewis hastened his departure. Commander Porter, with his Mexican squadron, had been cruising between Havana and Matanzas, for some days but information reached Cuba, just before the sailing of the Planter. Source: The Southern Recorder, Milledgeville, Georgia, February 5, 1827. 

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    Thursday, March 2, 2017

    Duel in Charleston SC #history #southcarolinapioneersnet


    Duel in Charleston
    By Jeannette Holland Austin Jeannette Holland Austin(profile) 

    duels"A report reached us last week that Mr. McDuffie of South Carolina had been killed in a duel by Mr. Metcalfe of Kentucky. But this was not the fact. A challenge was sent by McDuffie to Metcalfe and accepted. Judge Clarke, who acted as the friend of General Metcalf proposed rifles, as the weapons to be used on the occasion. This was objected to by Major Hamilton, the friend of McDuffie, who contended that the weapon should be pistols. Judge Clarke resisted on their right to the choice, which was not conceded by Major Hamilton. And here the matter rests." Source: The Southern Recorder, Milledgeville, Georgia. March 12, 1827. 

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